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Desserts That Won’t Desert You

(Friendship, Uncategorized) Permanent link

Even though a Kappa may be stuffed before reaching the dessert round of Thanksgiving, no holiday meal is complete without a bite or two of something sweet before the holiday-food coma sets in. We plucked a few recipes from the archives to perfectly end your Thanksgiving meal.

Clicking on the recipe image will open a PDF document with a printable recipe card.

Rhubarb Pie-de-luxe
Betty Monahan Volk, Ohio Wesleyan
As written in Brunches, Lunches and Dinners, compiled by the Philadelphia Alumnae Association, 1975

Rhubarb Pie-de-luxe

Banana Cake
Katherine Price, SMU
As written in House Directors’ Cookbook, 1984

Banana Cake

Coffee Marshmallow Mousse
Ruth Huntington Thompson, Colorado
As written in Kappa Kappa Gamma Cook Book, compiled by Denver Alumnae Association, 1932

Coffee Marshmallow Mousse

Puffed Fruit Fritters
Rheva Ott Shryock, Pennsylvania, Grand President 1936–1940
As written in The Kappa Key to Cookery, compiled by Denison, 1940

Puffed Fruit Fritters

Some of these recipes give full directions, some are missing oven temperatures and some ingredients use nomenclature that is not easily recognizable by today’s standards. For the recipe cards, we used the literal translation from the recipe books, rewording only a few things to make the recipe comprehensible.

Did you miss our other week of thanks posts? Click here!

PC: To print the PDF recipe cards, first download the recipe to your desktop. Once you open the PDF, click “File” in the top left-hand corner and go to “Print.”  Go to the section labeled “Page Handling” and under “Page Scaling,” select “Multiple Pages per Sheet.” Under “Pages per Sheet,” select “Custom” and then type in the adjacent boxes “1 by 2.” Select “OK” to print the card.

Mac: To print from the “Preview” PDF viewer, first download the recipe to your desktop. Once you open the PDF, click “File” in the top left-hand corner and go to “Print.” Select the blue downward pointing arrow to the right of printer selection to open up options. On the bottom right-hand side, you will see “Pages per Sheet.” Select two pages per sheet. Then, select “Print” at the bottom of the document.

It's Turkey-Lurky Time

(Friendship, Uncategorized) Permanent link

Whatever your Thanksgiving recipe tradition brings to the table—turkey, ham or grandma’s famous salad—every family has a few special dishes. We dusted off the old cookbooks for some time-tested traditional recipes of our own. Today we feature entrée and side dishes that will fill you with thanks for these old recipe books.

Clicking on the recipe image will open a PDF document with a printable recipe card.

Entrée:

Thanksgiving Turkey
Lexington Alumnae Association
As written in Key to Kentucky Kitchens, 1962

Thanksgiving Turkey

Baked Ham
Emily Spray Dickson, Colorado
As written in Kappa Kappa Gamma Cook Book, compiled by the Denver Alumnae Association, 1932

Baked Ham Recipe Card

Side Dish:

Beans and Carrots Au Gratin
Ethland Moore Vickery, Oklahoma
As written in Kappa Kappa Gamma Cook Book, compiled by the Denver Alumnae Association, 1932

Beans and Carrots Au Gratin

Refrigerator Rolls
Margaret Clift Prewitt, Kentucky
As written in Key to Kentucky Kitchens, compiled by the Lexington Alumnae Association, 1962

Refrigerator Rolls

Some of these recipes give full directions, some are missing oven temperatures and some ingredients use nomenclature that is not easily recognizable by today’s standards. For the recipe cards, we used the literal translation from the recipe books, rewording only a few things to make the recipe comprehensible.

Check in tomorrow to view dessert recipes from other Kappa recipe books! Did you miss our other week of thanks posts? Click here!

PC: To print the PDF recipe cards, first download the recipe to your desktop. Once you open the PDF, click “File” in the top left-hand corner and go to “Print.”  Go to the section labeled “Page Handling” and under “Page Scaling,” select “Multiple Pages per Sheet.” Under “Pages per Sheet,” select “Custom” and then type in the adjacent boxes “1 by 2.” Select “OK” to print the card.

Mac: To print from the “Preview” PDF viewer, first download the recipe to your desktop. Once you open the PDF, click “File” in the top left-hand corner and go to “Print.” Select the blue downward pointing arrow to the right of printer selection to open up options. On the bottom right-hand side, you will see “Pages per Sheet.” Select two pages per sheet. Then, select “Print” at the bottom of the document.


Counting Kappa Among Her Blessings

(Friendship, Sisterhood, Uncategorized) Permanent link

By Beth Black, Illinois Wesleyan

Editor’s note: This week is a week of thanks for Kappa Kappa Gamma. Stop by often—we’ll post recipes from the archives and share why we are thankful, beginning with Beth Black, Director of Programs and Education, who experienced the tornadoes that struck the Midwest November 17.

Thanksgiving always has been one of my favorite holidays. Who doesn’t love a celebration centered around gratitude, family and, of course, food?  This year, the list of things for which I’m grateful has grown exponentially.

I’m told that it only took 20 seconds for a tornado to rip apart my son’s home and life as we’ve known it.  As my son and daughter-in-law and my grandson cowered in a closet beneath their stairs, over a thousand homes were destroyed in my beloved town of Washington, Ill., when an EF-4 monstrosity tore through neighborhoods, leaving a path of destruction that is still incomprehensible to me even as I stare at it with my own eyes.

I was on my way home from a meeting at Fraternity Headquarters in Columbus, Ohio, when my phone started pinging with tornado warnings. I wasn’t sure if the warnings were for my current location of Indianapolis, Ind., or for home, but at the time, I wasn’t too concerned. Living in central Illinois, tornadoes are a fairly frequent occurrence.

Just as I was leaving Brownsburg, Ind., my husband, Al, called to tell me that a tornado had gone through town. Hearing the rising panic in his voice as he tried to reach my son’s neighborhood, the debris and disorientation making his trek difficult, I became scared. We knew that they were alive but their home was destroyed.

Randy's Yard

My mother also lives in Washington, and Al told me to call her to see if she was safe.  The telephone landlines were damaged so all calls were immediately being routed to a “no service” message. I frantically hit the redial button on my phone for almost a half hour before Al called to tell me he had my mother with him. Her home was damaged, but less than a half a block away, the houses were reduced to rubble. He also confirmed that our youngest son, who was home alone at the time of the tornado, was safe and that our house was unharmed.

Within the hour, my phone was bombarded with text messages and phone calls. Many, many of those calls came from Kappas. “Where are you?” “Are you okay?” “What can we do to help?” The outpouring of concern was truly overwhelming. I heard from Kappas I’ve known for years and those whom I’ve met only once or twice. The offers of assistance started within an hour of the catastrophe and continue on a daily basis. Some days, the sweet messages that I receive from my sisters and other friends are the only things that keep me afloat.

For right now, my son’s family, my mother and a teammate of my youngest son are staying with us. Because of Kappa and some other volunteer organizations, I know that their immediate needs have been met.  Through the generosity of my KKG sisters, I know that we’ll be able to help them replace things we have yet to consider.

So this Thursday when our family celebrates Thanksgiving—all of us safe and together—I will count this amazing sisterhood we call Kappa Kappa Gamma among my blessings. May you, too, take a moment to reflect on the unparalleled support that we enjoy as members of this organization. Happy Thanksgiving!

Check in tomorrow as we continue our week of thanks with recipes from books hidden in our archives!

More Than Just a Girl and a Guitar

(Uncategorized) Permanent link

Ashley Rauls

When she’s not performing, singer-songwriter Ashley Rauls, Furman, focuses on just being a regular college student—but with a dream. Taking her music career a day at a time, Ashley says it’s important to try to make school and music work at the same time.

While balancing school and a music career can be challenging, Ashley says support from her Kappa sisters helps. During an out-of-town gig, Ashley looked up to find her grand-big sitting in the audience. “It was the best feeling and surprise to have her there. Only a Kappa would do that.”

Trained in classical piano before picking up guitar, Ashley writes her own music. “I’d rather pursue it now than regret it twenty years down the road.”

Categorizing her music as indie-folk, she is influenced by Bob Dylan and her surroundings. “I find inspiration in problems and looking for ways to find answers, in traveling and meeting different people. I’m inspired by those who go after their dreams, even if they pursue something that doesn’t have a set path that’s proven to succeed. As for Bob Dylan, he seems to come up quite often, but it’s hard to not be influenced by him. He was all about the words, a true poet, and for me the words matter the most.”



As with all artists, Ashley has dealt with the stresses of image.  “It’s hard enough to decide what or who you want to be as a person, but throw in the fact that you have to decide on an image to portray to an audience—it’s tough to be yourself.”  Ashley responded to that challenge with her first EP, What You Want Me To Be. “People try to please others before they please themselves, but it should really be reversed.”

She focuses on writing songs that speak truth to her life and her experiences, instead of trying to please the masses. “It’s great to play a set and then have complete strangers come up to me and say they relate to the music. That’s the great thing about my songs. I write them from my own experience and the audience relates to it from their own experiences. There’s no right or wrong interpretation, but if a song can make someone feel something, then it’s a good song in my opinion.”

Ashley’s next EP is scheduled for release in the first half of 2014. “A U.S. tour is definitely in the works for the summer of 2014, so follow me on social media to keep up on release dates! I’d love to see Kappas meet up at my shows!”

Follow Ashley on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube to hear her new music and keep up to date on her tour dates!

Headquarter Hauntings

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“Kappas are a caring, supportive sisterhood, watching over their members and ready with a helping hand. How appropriate, then, that Kappa Kappa Gamma should have a spectral ‘caretaker’ watching over visitors at their Headquarters.”

        - Robin Smith, Columbus Ghosts


Pink Lady

The building that currently houses Kappa Kappa Gamma Fraternity Headquarters was originally built in 1852 by Phillip Snowden, a silk merchant, and his wife Abigail. The home has gone through several different owners over its time, including Governor David Tod during the Civil War era and banker David Gray and his family. From there the Columbus Women’s Club used the home as a clubhouse, adding an auditorium to the back of the building. Financial issues from the Great Depression caused them to sell the house, leaving it to fall into the hands of several more owners over the next decade. Eventually, it was bought by Clara O. Pierce, Ohio State, in 1951 to be used as our Headquarters.

Over the past 62 years, Kappa volunteers, interns and staff members have reported seeing and hearing strange things happening around Headquarters. There are tales of a woman roaming the building, a man in black wandering the halls, and a formally dressed couple on the stairwell.

Diane Selby, Ohio State, was a student worker at Headquarters during the late 1950s. During her time here, Diane experienced a number of mysterious encounters. One day, she heard the vacuum running in the closet. Thinking that the cleaner, Adele, had forgotten to turn it off, Diane turned it off and went about her business. When she saw Adele later that day, she talked to her about leaving the vacuum running. Adele said that it was impossible, as there are no outlets in or near the closet. The two went to investigate only to find the vacuum cleaner running again, unplugged, in the closet.

Diane had another inexplicable experience with a coworker. Their desks were next to a window overlooking a courtyard, when Diane heard a musical quartet. Glancing out of the window, she found the courtyard to be empty, oddly. Knowing the music was too loud to be coming from the neighbors, she asked her office mate if she heard the music as well. Her coworker acknowledged hearing the music. “But,” Diane said, “There is nobody out there.” Her coworker, keeping her eyes on her work, simply acknowledged the instance, saying “Yes, I know.”

The most famous ghost though is that of Miss Celinda Hatton, infamously known as the Pink Lady. Miss Hatton was the caretaker of the upper rooms during the early 1900s when the Columbus Women’s Association rented the top floor to boarders. She was a talented portrait artist whose picture still hangs in our Headquarters’ dining room. She was known to run a respectable establishment and took excellent care of her guests. She would often walk the halls in a pink robe to make sure everything was alright. Many believe that she still roams the halls, checking in on Kappa’s guests.

President Julie Leshay, Colorado College, has spent many nights at Headquarters for meetings and has encountered the Pink Lady. During one of her stays, Julie was woken by someone frantically running up and down the steps. Thinking it was someone who had come into work, she went back to sleep. It wasn’t until the next morning that Julie realized the noise she heard had happened too early to be an employee coming to check on them. No one else staying there heard the sounds nor had they gotten up in the middle of the night. “I personally haven’t seen her, thank goodness,” says Julie. “I like to think of the Pink Lady as our sisterly guardian so that's why I wasn't scared when I heard the footsteps.”

Museums Curator and Archivist Kylie Smith Towers, Simpson, recalls one of the more popular Pink Lady ghost tales. “During one very late council meeting, the Kappas took a brief break, all putting on their pajamas and robes before returning to continue the meeting,” says Kylie. “When they returned, the secretary called roll to be sure everyone was back.” They all were there, but then, who was the woman in the pink robe they saw walk past the doorway in the main hall? Hurrying into the hall, they found it empty; no woman in a pink robe was to be found in the house.

Have you had any paranormal encounters while staying at or visiting Fraternity Headquarters? Share in the comments below!

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