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Thank You

(Leadership) Permanent link

During the month of November, many take time to reflect on all they are thankful for. As an organization of 141 active chapters and more than 255,000 initiated members, Kappa Kappa Gamma has much to be thankful for this holiday season.

Kappa empowers women to do meaningful things in their communities through our service model. As a result, Kappas have spent more than 277,000 service hours improving their communities and the lives of others.

This year we have installed five new chapters, initiated more than 3,000 new members since July and over the past biennium have raised more than $2.46 million for the Kappa Kappa Gamma Foundation, local community organizations and our national philanthropic partner, Reading Is Fundamental. These accomplishments have given us many people to thank this holiday season.  

Thank you to all who donate to the Kappa Kappa Gamma Foundation—with your support we are able to provide more than $1.25 million annually in support of scholarships, Rose McGill aid, historical preservation through The Stewart House and The Heritage Museum, and educational and leadership programming for women of all ages.

We thank all who serve in our Official Family—where one is capable, many are strong. With these women at the forefront, Kappa Kappa Gamma is assured a successful, fulfilling future.

We thank all who support our chapters—your dedication to your work helps keep our sisterhood strong and growing. Your service to the communities you live in and the philanthropies you support shows the world the great things our members can achieve.

We thank all who support our associations—the energy you put in helps keep members engaged and connected with the organization. Our associations give members the ability to stay connected with their sisters and make Kappas feel at home no matter where they move.

As an organization that thrives on sisterhood, leadership and loyalty, we thank all those who help our organization grow, flourish and achieve amazing things through their participation. Kappas are the heart of this organization and your continued participation helps to keep our legacy and traditions alive.

Loyally,

 Julie Leshay              Kay Tennison

Julie M. Leshay Kay Reid Tennison
Fraternity President Foundation President

 

 

Desserts That Won’t Desert You

(Friendship, Uncategorized) Permanent link

Even though a Kappa may be stuffed before reaching the dessert round of Thanksgiving, no holiday meal is complete without a bite or two of something sweet before the holiday-food coma sets in. We plucked a few recipes from the archives to perfectly end your Thanksgiving meal.

Clicking on the recipe image will open a PDF document with a printable recipe card.

Rhubarb Pie-de-luxe
Betty Monahan Volk, Ohio Wesleyan
As written in Brunches, Lunches and Dinners, compiled by the Philadelphia Alumnae Association, 1975

Rhubarb Pie-de-luxe

Banana Cake
Katherine Price, SMU
As written in House Directors’ Cookbook, 1984

Banana Cake

Coffee Marshmallow Mousse
Ruth Huntington Thompson, Colorado
As written in Kappa Kappa Gamma Cook Book, compiled by Denver Alumnae Association, 1932

Coffee Marshmallow Mousse

Puffed Fruit Fritters
Rheva Ott Shryock, Pennsylvania, Grand President 1936–1940
As written in The Kappa Key to Cookery, compiled by Denison, 1940

Puffed Fruit Fritters

Some of these recipes give full directions, some are missing oven temperatures and some ingredients use nomenclature that is not easily recognizable by today’s standards. For the recipe cards, we used the literal translation from the recipe books, rewording only a few things to make the recipe comprehensible.

Did you miss our other week of thanks posts? Click here!

PC: To print the PDF recipe cards, first download the recipe to your desktop. Once you open the PDF, click “File” in the top left-hand corner and go to “Print.”  Go to the section labeled “Page Handling” and under “Page Scaling,” select “Multiple Pages per Sheet.” Under “Pages per Sheet,” select “Custom” and then type in the adjacent boxes “1 by 2.” Select “OK” to print the card.

Mac: To print from the “Preview” PDF viewer, first download the recipe to your desktop. Once you open the PDF, click “File” in the top left-hand corner and go to “Print.” Select the blue downward pointing arrow to the right of printer selection to open up options. On the bottom right-hand side, you will see “Pages per Sheet.” Select two pages per sheet. Then, select “Print” at the bottom of the document.

It's Turkey-Lurky Time

(Friendship, Uncategorized) Permanent link

Whatever your Thanksgiving recipe tradition brings to the table—turkey, ham or grandma’s famous salad—every family has a few special dishes. We dusted off the old cookbooks for some time-tested traditional recipes of our own. Today we feature entrée and side dishes that will fill you with thanks for these old recipe books.

Clicking on the recipe image will open a PDF document with a printable recipe card.

Entrée:

Thanksgiving Turkey
Lexington Alumnae Association
As written in Key to Kentucky Kitchens, 1962

Thanksgiving Turkey

Baked Ham
Emily Spray Dickson, Colorado
As written in Kappa Kappa Gamma Cook Book, compiled by the Denver Alumnae Association, 1932

Baked Ham Recipe Card

Side Dish:

Beans and Carrots Au Gratin
Ethland Moore Vickery, Oklahoma
As written in Kappa Kappa Gamma Cook Book, compiled by the Denver Alumnae Association, 1932

Beans and Carrots Au Gratin

Refrigerator Rolls
Margaret Clift Prewitt, Kentucky
As written in Key to Kentucky Kitchens, compiled by the Lexington Alumnae Association, 1962

Refrigerator Rolls

Some of these recipes give full directions, some are missing oven temperatures and some ingredients use nomenclature that is not easily recognizable by today’s standards. For the recipe cards, we used the literal translation from the recipe books, rewording only a few things to make the recipe comprehensible.

Check in tomorrow to view dessert recipes from other Kappa recipe books! Did you miss our other week of thanks posts? Click here!

PC: To print the PDF recipe cards, first download the recipe to your desktop. Once you open the PDF, click “File” in the top left-hand corner and go to “Print.”  Go to the section labeled “Page Handling” and under “Page Scaling,” select “Multiple Pages per Sheet.” Under “Pages per Sheet,” select “Custom” and then type in the adjacent boxes “1 by 2.” Select “OK” to print the card.

Mac: To print from the “Preview” PDF viewer, first download the recipe to your desktop. Once you open the PDF, click “File” in the top left-hand corner and go to “Print.” Select the blue downward pointing arrow to the right of printer selection to open up options. On the bottom right-hand side, you will see “Pages per Sheet.” Select two pages per sheet. Then, select “Print” at the bottom of the document.


The Start to a Merry Feast

 Permanent link

Thanksgiving can be a stressful time of year. With in-laws coming into town, traveling and preparing large meals, a Kappa may find herself in a pinch. Luckily, Kappas past are here to help! Throughout the week, we will be building a meal from Kappa cookbooks that we have procured over the years.

Recipe Books

Today, we feature hors d’oeuvres and beverages from The Kappa Key to Cookery, a recipe book compiled by Gamma Omega, Denison,  in 1940. This handwritten recipe book features recipes from several notable Kappas, including Clara O. Pierce, Ohio State, Executive Secretary from 1929–1969. Several copies of this recipe book are housed in the archives at Kappa Kappa Gamma Headquarters.

Clicking on the recipe image will open a PDF document with a printable recipe card.

Hors d’oeuvres:

Cheese Balls
Clara O. Pierce, Ohio State, Executive Secretary 1929–1969
As written in The Kappa Key to Cookery, compiled by Denison, 1940

Cheese Balls Recipe Book

Tomato Salad Sandwiches
Helen Lockhart Atwell, mother of Ruth Atwell, Denison
As written in The Kappa Key to Cookery, compiled by Denison, 1940

Tomato Salad Sandwich Recipe Book

Beverages:

Tea Punch
As served at the Gamma Province Convention, Granville, Ohio in 1939
As written in The Kappa Key to Cookery, compiled by Denison, 1940

Tea Punch Recipe Book

Ruby Fruit Punch
Helen Scarritt Pearson, Denison
As written in The Kappa Key to Cookery, compiled by Denison, 1940

Ruby Fruit Punch Recipe Book

Some of these recipes give full directions, some are missing oven temperatures and some ingredients use nomenclature that is not easily recognizable by today’s standards. For the recipe cards, we used the literal translation from the recipe books, rewording only a few things to make the recipe comprehensible.

Check in tomorrow to view entrée and side dish recipes from other Kappa recipe books! Did you miss the first entry for our week of thanks featuring Beth Black, Director of Programs and Education? Click here!

PC: To print the PDF recipe cards, first download the recipe to your desktop. Once you open the PDF, click “File” in the top left-hand corner and go to “Print.”  Go to the section labeled “Page Handling” and under “Page Scaling,” select “Multiple Pages per Sheet.” Under “Pages per Sheet,” select “Custom” and then type in the adjacent boxes “1 by 2.” Select “OK” to print the card.

Mac: To print from the “Preview” PDF viewer, first download the recipe to your desktop. Once you open the PDF, click “File” in the top left-hand corner and go to “Print.” Select the blue downward pointing arrow to the right of printer selection to open up options. On the bottom right-hand side, you will see “Pages per Sheet.” Select two pages per sheet. Then, select “Print” at the bottom of the document.

Counting Kappa Among Her Blessings

(Friendship, Sisterhood, Uncategorized) Permanent link

By Beth Black, Illinois Wesleyan

Editor’s note: This week is a week of thanks for Kappa Kappa Gamma. Stop by often—we’ll post recipes from the archives and share why we are thankful, beginning with Beth Black, Director of Programs and Education, who experienced the tornadoes that struck the Midwest November 17.

Thanksgiving always has been one of my favorite holidays. Who doesn’t love a celebration centered around gratitude, family and, of course, food?  This year, the list of things for which I’m grateful has grown exponentially.

I’m told that it only took 20 seconds for a tornado to rip apart my son’s home and life as we’ve known it.  As my son and daughter-in-law and my grandson cowered in a closet beneath their stairs, over a thousand homes were destroyed in my beloved town of Washington, Ill., when an EF-4 monstrosity tore through neighborhoods, leaving a path of destruction that is still incomprehensible to me even as I stare at it with my own eyes.

I was on my way home from a meeting at Fraternity Headquarters in Columbus, Ohio, when my phone started pinging with tornado warnings. I wasn’t sure if the warnings were for my current location of Indianapolis, Ind., or for home, but at the time, I wasn’t too concerned. Living in central Illinois, tornadoes are a fairly frequent occurrence.

Just as I was leaving Brownsburg, Ind., my husband, Al, called to tell me that a tornado had gone through town. Hearing the rising panic in his voice as he tried to reach my son’s neighborhood, the debris and disorientation making his trek difficult, I became scared. We knew that they were alive but their home was destroyed.

Randy's Yard

My mother also lives in Washington, and Al told me to call her to see if she was safe.  The telephone landlines were damaged so all calls were immediately being routed to a “no service” message. I frantically hit the redial button on my phone for almost a half hour before Al called to tell me he had my mother with him. Her home was damaged, but less than a half a block away, the houses were reduced to rubble. He also confirmed that our youngest son, who was home alone at the time of the tornado, was safe and that our house was unharmed.

Within the hour, my phone was bombarded with text messages and phone calls. Many, many of those calls came from Kappas. “Where are you?” “Are you okay?” “What can we do to help?” The outpouring of concern was truly overwhelming. I heard from Kappas I’ve known for years and those whom I’ve met only once or twice. The offers of assistance started within an hour of the catastrophe and continue on a daily basis. Some days, the sweet messages that I receive from my sisters and other friends are the only things that keep me afloat.

For right now, my son’s family, my mother and a teammate of my youngest son are staying with us. Because of Kappa and some other volunteer organizations, I know that their immediate needs have been met.  Through the generosity of my KKG sisters, I know that we’ll be able to help them replace things we have yet to consider.

So this Thursday when our family celebrates Thanksgiving—all of us safe and together—I will count this amazing sisterhood we call Kappa Kappa Gamma among my blessings. May you, too, take a moment to reflect on the unparalleled support that we enjoy as members of this organization. Happy Thanksgiving!

Check in tomorrow as we continue our week of thanks with recipes from books hidden in our archives!

More Than Just a Girl and a Guitar

(Uncategorized) Permanent link

Ashley Rauls

When she’s not performing, singer-songwriter Ashley Rauls, Furman, focuses on just being a regular college student—but with a dream. Taking her music career a day at a time, Ashley says it’s important to try to make school and music work at the same time.

While balancing school and a music career can be challenging, Ashley says support from her Kappa sisters helps. During an out-of-town gig, Ashley looked up to find her grand-big sitting in the audience. “It was the best feeling and surprise to have her there. Only a Kappa would do that.”

Trained in classical piano before picking up guitar, Ashley writes her own music. “I’d rather pursue it now than regret it twenty years down the road.”

Categorizing her music as indie-folk, she is influenced by Bob Dylan and her surroundings. “I find inspiration in problems and looking for ways to find answers, in traveling and meeting different people. I’m inspired by those who go after their dreams, even if they pursue something that doesn’t have a set path that’s proven to succeed. As for Bob Dylan, he seems to come up quite often, but it’s hard to not be influenced by him. He was all about the words, a true poet, and for me the words matter the most.”



As with all artists, Ashley has dealt with the stresses of image.  “It’s hard enough to decide what or who you want to be as a person, but throw in the fact that you have to decide on an image to portray to an audience—it’s tough to be yourself.”  Ashley responded to that challenge with her first EP, What You Want Me To Be. “People try to please others before they please themselves, but it should really be reversed.”

She focuses on writing songs that speak truth to her life and her experiences, instead of trying to please the masses. “It’s great to play a set and then have complete strangers come up to me and say they relate to the music. That’s the great thing about my songs. I write them from my own experience and the audience relates to it from their own experiences. There’s no right or wrong interpretation, but if a song can make someone feel something, then it’s a good song in my opinion.”

Ashley’s next EP is scheduled for release in the first half of 2014. “A U.S. tour is definitely in the works for the summer of 2014, so follow me on social media to keep up on release dates! I’d love to see Kappas meet up at my shows!”

Follow Ashley on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube to hear her new music and keep up to date on her tour dates!

Homes Tour Celebrates 62 Years of Giving

(Philanthropy) Permanent link

Since 1952, the Greater Kansas City Alumnae Association has hosted the Kappa Homes Tour featuring several of Kansas City’s finest homes. The tour began as an opportunity to give back to the Kansas City community, sparked by an idea from Isabelle Helmers, Missouri. She envisioned the project “to put to use the talents of members for a productive, cohesive reason with the proceeds to permanently support philanthropy.”  This year will be the 62nd tour and the association is planning on it being the largest tour to date.

Homes Tour

Typically a two-day event, the association decided to add an additional day to give more Kappas a chance to experience the tour. “We have always had bus tours come from out of town and are hoping that by adding an additional day we might generate more interest,” says Christina Frank Erwin, Washington Univ. They also hope the additional day will increase local traffic and the proceeds they are able to give to the charities.

Proceeds from ticket sales for the tour will go to two local charities, the Children’s Center for the Visually Impaired, and the Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault. Proceeds will also benefit the Kappa Kappa Gamma Foundation. “We are very proud of our long history of supporting the Kansas City community and the Kappa Foundation through our tour,” says Valerie Chaloud, Kansas. The association was honored at the 2012 General Convention for reaching the highest level of giving to the Foundation.

The tour begins on Wednesday, December 4, with a preview luncheon featuring guest speaker Karolyn “ZuZu” Grimes, an actress in “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Guests will also have the opportunity to preview the four homes on the tour before they open to the general public. The luncheon is sponsored through a matching gift challenge by Teresa Keith Walsh, Oklahoma State, and Kelsey Walsh Perry, Kansas, co-founder and co-president of Silpada Designs, respectively. “Teresa and Kelsey are matching the first $10,000 of Owl Friend donations received during the luncheon,” says Christina. “'Owl Friends of our Tour' is a new program we launched this year. We ask Kappas to make a tax-deductible contribution to help offset the costs of producing the tour, thereby increasing the final proceeds we are able to distribute to our beneficiaries.”
 
For all three days, there will be a Gift and Gourmet Shop where Kappa-baked goods and Margaret Furlong angel ornaments will be sold. All proceeds from the baked goods and ornaments will benefit the charities. The association has also secured more than 20 consignors that will sell everything from apparel and jewelry to home décor and holiday greens, with 25 percent of those sales benefiting the tour.

“We are also introducing our first Girls’ Night Out event at the Gift and Gourmet Shop on Thursday, December 5,” says Kristi Miller, Kansas State. This event will include giveaways and fun events to encourage Kappas, their family and friends to shop for the cause.  “We have lined up four holiday-themed demonstrations, from makeup to mixology, for this special night,” says Kristi. “We will have a number of fun door prizes to be announced throughout the evening and consignor specials.”

Tickets for the preview luncheon can be purchased online at the Kappa Homes Tour website. Homes Tour tickets can also be purchased on the website in advance, or during the tour at the featured homes or the Gift and Gourmet Shop. The Gift and Gourmet shop is free and open to the public during the event, as is the Girls’ Night Out event. For more information, please check out the Kappa Homes Tour website and Facebook page!

Kappa Is ...

(Friendship, Sisterhood) Permanent link

By: Hailey Hirst, Idaho

“… And in the very end, Kappa can only be a better way to stumble up the back steps and walk gracefully out the front door.”


1940 Beta Kappas

I thought I had it all figured out by senior year when my pledge class read the “Kappa Is” story on preference day. I thought I knew all that Kappa could mean as I finally got the hang of college life and quickly approached graduation. I thought, after my term as Vice President-Academic Excellence, that I knew the goals and values of Kappa backward and forward. But now, a few months after graduation, I’ve realized – I’m still learning what Kappa is.

Following the metaphor of “Kappa Is,” I literally fell on the steps and skinned my knee on Bid Day, but four years later I walked gracefully out of the front door wearing a cap and gown. Kappa was home, it was my network of supporting individuals, and a culmination of values and ideals that helped me grow into the woman I am today.
On my graduation day and in the days after, I thought of all the women before me who walked out of their chapter houses’ front doors wearing caps and gowns, treading carefully down the stairs in high heels, straightening sisters’ cords and necklaces, smiling with their graduating class, and then continuing forward into the world beyond the Kappa house. Each spring sees this same transition at all Kappa chapters, this same jittery bittersweet day that marks the transition from active to alumna.

2013

Kappa was more than I could have asked for, and as a senior on the cusp of graduating, I was sure of the way Kappa had changed my life for the better. It was heartbreaking to leave my big white house on the hill, to say goodbye to my sisters and to our beloved Kappa advisers. But with all the changes of post-graduate life, a new kind of Kappa is beginning to soak in for me—the big picture.

Now joining the ranks of Kappa alumnae, I am more aware of the scope of the Fraternity. I now see how large Kappa is, and what a valuable legacy I am a part of. I appreciate being part of something that stretches back more than century and indefinitely into the future, that spans the globe where Kappas, both active and alumnae, continue the sisterhood.

As I move into the professional realm, Kappa is an asset to me, not only for opportunities to contribute to the organization, but also to connect with other Kappas in the world. Kappa is a strong network of women in places where I may move, or in career fields I may enter. But most vividly real to me right now is that this Kappa is moving to Denver two months after graduation, not knowing anyone, and having a sister come visit.

What I’m learning now is that what “Kappa Is” evolves throughout our lives. And always, Kappa is a promise – that no matter when or where we are, we will always have Kappa to bind us both to one another, and to the core of qualities which drew us in and poised us to become the women we are now.

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